Was this helpful?




Do you have something to say?

Post Comments

Preposition of Place Correct Usage

March 17, 2019
Preposition of Place Correct Usage

Prepositions of place show the relationship of place between the nouns to the other parts of a sentence.
Common prepositions of places & direction: On, at, in, by, from, to, towards, up, down, across, between, among, through, in front of, behind, above, over, under, below, etc. are the most common.

IN, AT

IN:

In indicates something to be present in a place or enclosure. It does not say particularly where but gives an enclosure to the noun it connects with.
Example:
  • Your shirt is in the closet. (Does not indicate an exact place)
  • He lives in Australia.
  • Alex works in that building.

AT:

At indicates an exact place.
Example:
  • He is at the door.
  • I am standing at 13/4 George Street.
  • He is at home.

ON, ABOVE, OVER 

ON:

On indicates a position above but touching the object.
Example:
  • The phone is on the table. (Phone is touching with the table)
  • He is on the third floor.
  • Sit on the sofa.

ABOVE:

Above indicates a much higher position than the preposition on does. It also indicates something out of reach.
Example:
  • The sky is above my head.
  • Hold your hands above your head.
  • Stars are above the sky.

OVER

Over means a position between on and above which is not touching.
Example:
  • There are clouds over the hills.
  • A bird flew over my head.
  • My flat is over that shop.

UNDER, BELOW

UNDER:

Under is the opposite of on and means ‘below the surface of’ something.
Example:
  • The cat is under the table.
  • The carpet under my feet is very soft.
  • That book is under my glasses.

BELLOW:

Below indicates something at a slightly lower position than what under indicates.
Example:
  • I have a scar just below my right eye.
  • Do you see the line below the paper?
  • Please, don’t write below this line.

TO, FROM

TO:

To indicates a motion in the direction of a place.
Example:
  • He went to college.
  • We are going to Mexico.
  • We walked from the farm to the beach.

FROM

From indicates the point of place at which a motion, journey, or action starts.
Example:
  • He came from England.
  • We walked from the beach to the farm.
  • He drove here from Atlanta.

INTO, OUT OF

INTO:

Into indicates a motion towards/going inside something. It has many uses.
Example:
  • He came into the house.
  • The police broke into the bar.
  • My car crashed into a street sign.

OUT OF:

Out of means the opposite of into. It indicates a motion towards outside of something.
Example:
  • He is going out of the town.
  • Get out of my house.
  • Please, remain out of this. (Not indicating a place but an issue)

THROUGH,  ACROSS, BESIDE,  IN FRONT OF,  BEHIND, TOWARDS,  BY

THROUGH:

Through indicates a motion in the middle of something.
Example:
  • We drove through the tunnel.
  • They came through a forest.
  • He came through a wedding gate.

ACROSS:

Across means going to the other side of a river or road or something straight.
Example:
  • He went across the river.
  • I walked across the road.
  • My house is across the bank. (There is a road between the house and the bank)

BESIDE:

Beside means at the side of/ next to something.
Example:
  • The car beside the cycle is mine.
  • He is standing beside the shop.
  • I will always be beside you.

IN FRONT OF

In front of means a position facing someone/something.
Example:
  • He parked his car in front of my house.
  • I have a pool in front of my resthouse.
  • He was nervous in front of me.

BEHIND:

Behind means at the far side of something (might be out of sight). It is opposite of in front of.
Example:
  • He parked his car behind my car.
  • I have a pool behind my house.
  • Go behind that tree.

TOWARDS:

Towards means a motion in the direction of something literary or metaphorically.
Example:
  • Take five steps towards the post and stand there.
  • They moved towards the Labour Party.
  • I walked towards the car when you were standing.

BY

By means ‘near to or next to’ something or someone.
Example:
  • He has a house by the river.
  • I was standing by the car.
  • My flat is by the saloon.

UP, DOWN

UP:

Up means a motion towards a higher place or position.
Example:
  • We were climbing up the mountain.
  • Lift your hands up.
  • John is going up to London. (From a lower place of the country)
  • Climb up the stairs.

DOWN:

Down indicates the opposite meaning of up. It means a motion towards a lower place or position.
Example:
  • He was walking down the river.
  • I am climbing down the hill.
  • Go down the stairs.

BETWEEN, AMONG

BETWEEN:

Between indicates something/someone to be in the middle of two other things or persons.
Example:
  • Alex is sitting between Robin and Robert.
  • The cat is between the two boxes.
  • This matter is between you and him.

Among:

Among indicates something/someone to be in the middle of three or more other things or persons.
Example:
  • Alex is sitting among the patients.
  • He is the best among them.
  • Among all the people, John had the courage to speak up.

Source: Learn Grammar

Correct usage of Preposition of Place with examples.

Categories:

Post a Comment

[blogger]

Author Name

Contact Form

Name

Email *

Message *

Powered by Blogger.